Rowan Pains

I’m Paul Cardaciotto, and I am a journalism major at Rowan University.

Bosshart Demolition Follow-Up

with one comment

In case anyone didn’t realize, the majority of my previous post about Bosshart’s demolition was a joke and was meant to provoke laughter. If you didn’t catch it the first read through, the parts that were made up are pretty obvious. Soon after finishing that post, however, I realized that I really wanted to know the truth behind the demolition and decided to dig up the facts. Why, exactly, they are taking the building down slowly and what took them so long to finally begin the process are my main points of interest, so I decided that a good person to contact would be a Mr. Joseph Orlins, the Assistant Vice President of Facilities here at Rowan University. After a quick response, he forwarded my questions to Mary O. Acciani, the Director of Facilities Planning and Construction, who was more than happy to answer my questions directly. Though quite lengthy, I found that the answers she provided to my questions were so informing that I decided to simply post her response in it’s entirety for you all to see.

It was not decided that Bosshart’s demolition be a slow demolition. There are a number of things which go into the actual demolition of a building. Permits are required and these take time to get. In Bosshart’s case we first needed to empty the building. Once it was closed folks began storing all manner of things in the building. Since we are a State institution there is a specific (and lengthy) process we must follow to dispose of surplus items like those stored in Bosshart. This was time consuming. Once we had the building emptied we were able to proceed with testing and abatement of environmental hazards. This building was a challenge because of the hazardous materials in the building resulting from its use as a science teaching facility. Additionally, because of when it was constructed, it contained a significant amount of asbestos. These environmental hazards needed to be removed prior to demolition to assure that the disposal was properly conducted. Even the window frames were removed because they were found to contain material with asbestos. The actual demolition of the building itself is a very hazardous process. Because of its location near the sidewalk on Rt. 322 we wanted to do the demolition during the summer when there were few people on campus to reduce the risk. The sidewalk on Rt. 322 in front of the building will need to be closed during the work and as you can imagine, that is not something we wanted to do with classes in session.

It’s always interesting to see demolition on the news…it seems so quick. What they don’t tell you is the amount of work and the time it took to get to the point where the demolition could actually occur.

There you have it. The reason the demolition of Bosshart Hall is playing out the way it is, straight from the woman in charge of it all. Whether you agree or disagree with the way the situation was handled is up to you, but I think there is one thing that everyone can agree upon: Bosshart Hall is finally on its way out. Oh, and Rowan is going to be putting a small park in its place once it is finally gone. Again you may or may not like this plan of action, but anything is better than Bosshart.

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Written by rowanpains

April 2, 2008 at 2:46 am

Posted in Uncategorized

One Response

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  1. speaking of asbestos…did anyone else notice this? rowan posted, “warning, asbestos” signs on bosshart, but meanwhile, they had heavy duty fans blowing air from INSIDE the building OUT into the little courtyard behind the science building. nice job.

    Ariana

    April 30, 2008 at 6:21 pm


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